What documents do you need to set up a Dutch B.V. as a foreigner?

Setting up a Dutch limited liability Company

The Besloten Vennootschap or the Dutch B.V. is one of the most common company structures in the Netherlands.

It represents a private limited liability company frequently used by both foreign and local investors to carry out business activities in the Netherlands. 

Over the last six years, setting up a Dutch BV corporation has become easier and more affordable.

For example, in July 2011, changes to Dutch company law abolished the need for a ministerial “Declaration of No Object”, which shortened the Netherlands company formation process and lowered the costs. 

Then in October of 2012, the Flex B.V. Act came into force which eliminates the minimum share capital requirement to set up a Dutch BV company—this was previously set at €18,000.

Company registration process

To set up a  Netherlands company, you’ll need to fill out the required paperwork. 

This typically means that a public notary will draft your Deed of Incorporation (similar to an Articles of Association, which need to be in Dutch).

These contain information such as your business activities, regulation of a company’s operation shareholders, define the responsibility of the director, minimum share capital, registered address, and your management boards.

From there to complete your Netherlands legal entity registration, you need to 

1. verify the company name, 

2. collect due diligence documentation, 

3. submit your notarized documents and deed of incorporation, 

4.  register with the tax authorities and commercial registry (also known as KVK), 

5.  and open a bank account. 

Once all of that is squared away, you’re going to start operating in the Netherlands.

What you need to set up a dutch company:

  • Proof of your identity—copies of notarized passports of the director(s) and shareholder(s) of your new Dutch BV.
  • Proof of address—required for both your director(s) and shareholder(s) of the BV. This could include something simple like a utility bill or a bank statement.
  • Address in the Netherlands—your Netherlands BV will need a registered office with an address that is located in the country for formal correspondence. 

What you don’t need to set up a dutch company:

  • Dutch local director—a foreign person can be appointed as the director of a Dutch company. 
  • Travel to the Netherlands — 100% online.
  • Dutch bank account—while this is also not compulsory, having one will make it much easier to do business in the Netherlands and other European countries. Get more information about opening a bank account in the Netherlands

Documents required

  • legalised power of attorney 
  • data card 
  • UBO declaration 
  • Deed of incorporation 

Additional features exclusively for international clients

For our international clients, we offer additional services (with no extra costs) specifically designed for non-local non-residents.

Dutch company address

As part of our international company formation in the Netherlands package, we will look for and arrange a Dutch address for you at no extra charge (essential if you’d like to register your B.V. in the Netherlands).

This address will be used to receive any official letters sent from the dutch commercial register or the tax authority for example. 

FREE advice

We also provide FREE advice on choosing virtual banks in the Netherlands. 

Why is it so special?  It is because not all virtual banks accept non-residents director and rates and benefits might vary across providers. 

To save you time and money, we will help you navigate the Dutch system, providing tailored recommendations on the best virtual banks to use for your Dutch company.

Aftercare

Additionally, we will provide continuous aftercare service.

We understand that navigating the Dutch system as a non-resident can be challenging.

Having a trusted partner can minimize the stress as well as save you the costs associated with having to travel to the Netherlands.

Our international company formation in the Netherlands package doesn’t stop after the incorporation of your Dutch B.V. 

We will remain available after that and happy to answer any questions or solve any issues you might have.

Dutch company formation with no hidden fees

Personal services with local company formation agent 

No credit card number up front

We only charge you when  you fully understand with the price and the services that included.  

Simple Dutch B.V.
€1,800*

Why
choose us?

Dutch limited company "Besloten Vennootschap" BV FAQs

What does Dutch BV mean in business?

It is a dutch private limited liability company used by foreign and local investors to carry out business activities in the Netherlands. 

What does BV mean in Dutch ?

The BV abbreviation business stands for Besloten Vennootschap.  A Dutch B.V. is a limited liability company, which means that its shareholders are not personally responsible for the company’s debts.

How do you register a Dutch B.V. in Netherlands?

To register a dutch company, you’ll need to fill out the required paperwork. 

This typically means that a public notary will draft your Deed of Incorporation (which is similar to an Articles of Association, which need to be in Dutch). 

These contain information such as your dutch business activities, shareholders, share capital, registered address and your management boards.

From there, you need to verify the company name, collect due diligence documentation, submit your notarized documents and deed of incorporation, register with the tax authorities and Dutch company register, and open a bank account. 

Once all of that is squared away, you’re going to start operating in the Netherlands!

Is a dutch BV a corporation?

Yes,  a dutch BV is a legal entity which is legally a separate and distinct entity from its owners.

A dutch B.V. has the same legal rights and responsibilities as individuals.

Is a Dutch company a limited liability company?

Yes, a Dutch B.V. is a private limited liability company.

Why do companies incorporate in the Netherlands?

The Netherlands is a great place to incorporate a company for a number of reasons. 

Some UK ccompanies set up a dutch company because the costs of selling to EU customers have gone up at least two times after Brexit. 

Others decide on a company formation in the Netherlands because they are looking to test the market, gain access to the EU business channels.

Some companies open a company in Netherlands in order to apply for a VAT deferment licence for the convenience of their import and export business. 

The Netherlands is a great place to start. Not only that, but its one of the top English-speaking countries in the EU.